Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

4 dimensional inequality

Given non-negative reals such that \( a + b + c + d = 4 \), prove that

\[ a^2bc + b^2 cd + c^2 da + d^2 ab \leq 4. \]

Hint: Solve this problem.

Note by Calvin Lin
2 years, 7 months ago

No vote yet
1 vote

  Easy Math Editor

MarkdownAppears as
*italics* or _italics_ italics
**bold** or __bold__ bold

- bulleted
- list

  • bulleted
  • list

1. numbered
2. list

  1. numbered
  2. list
Note: you must add a full line of space before and after lists for them to show up correctly
paragraph 1

paragraph 2

paragraph 1

paragraph 2

[example link](https://brilliant.org)example link
> This is a quote
This is a quote
    # I indented these lines
    # 4 spaces, and now they show
    # up as a code block.

    print "hello world"
# I indented these lines
# 4 spaces, and now they show
# up as a code block.

print "hello world"
MathAppears as
Remember to wrap math in \( ... \) or \[ ... \] to ensure proper formatting.
2 \times 3 \( 2 \times 3 \)
2^{34} \( 2^{34} \)
a_{i-1} \( a_{i-1} \)
\frac{2}{3} \( \frac{2}{3} \)
\sqrt{2} \( \sqrt{2} \)
\sum_{i=1}^3 \( \sum_{i=1}^3 \)
\sin \theta \( \sin \theta \)
\boxed{123} \( \boxed{123} \)

Comments

Sort by:

Top Newest

Comment deleted Sep 16, 2015

Log in to reply

Hm, how did you get the first inequality? It doesn't seem true with \( a = 2, b = c = 1, d = 0 \). The LHS is 2, while the RHS is 4.

Calvin Lin Staff - 2 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

Can it be done with AM GM HM Inequalities

Satvik Choudhary - 2 years, 7 months ago

Log in to reply

It can be done with AM-GM, but not in a standard way. Note that it has "strange equality conditions".

Calvin Lin Staff - 2 years, 6 months ago

Log in to reply

Let \[f(a,b,c,d)=a^2bc + b^2cd + c^2da + d^2ab + k(a+b+c+d-4)\] (say this as equation \((1))\)

Solving these five equations \[\frac{\partial f}{\partial a} = 0\] \[\frac{\partial f}{\partial b} = 0\] \[\frac{\partial f}{\partial c} = 0\] \[\frac{\partial f}{\partial d} = 0\] \[a+b+c+d=4\]

we get \[a=b=c=d=1 , k=-4\]

substituting this back in equation \(1\) , we get \[f_{max}(a,b,c)=1+1+1+1-4(0) = 4\]

\(\textbf{Q.E.D}\)

@Calvin Lin sir

Aman Rajput - 2 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

The goal is to not use calculus.

Furthermore, note that \( (2, 1, 1, 0 ) \) is another equality condition, which is how I know that you didn't do the Lagrangian properly. There is a priori no reason why the answer must be symmetric.

Calvin Lin Staff - 2 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

Note again that ... case (2,1,1,0) doesnt satisfy the fourth equation

at this case \(\frac{\partial f}{\partial d} \neq 0\)

Aman Rajput - 2 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

@Aman Rajput Once again, you are not considering the boundary condition restraints. There is no argument that "f(2, 1, 1, 0) satisfies the equality condition", and so if it doesn't appear in your solution you have to ask yourself what is the mistake that you made.

If you want to apply a theorem, make sure you use it exactly and completely, and that you check all of the necessary conditions. E.g. Do not apply Arithmetic Mean - Geometric Mean on negative numbers.

Calvin Lin Staff - 2 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

@Calvin Lin Yaaa agree here .

Aman Rajput - 2 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...