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A parodox of quantum mechanics

Let us suppose we confine an electron in a volume v the we can know the uncertainity in its velocity. Now suppose we take a small volume d(v) and observe it . There are only two possibilities we find the electron or we do not find it . If we do not find it then we haven't interacted with the electron in any way but we have successfully reduced the confinement of electron to v - d(v) still keeping the uncertainity in velocity same thereby violating uncertainity principle . Thr key idea is measuring the positions the electron does not occupy and in a system there could be probability that the electron be absent from a space d(v). We are extracting information about electrons from thier absence rather than their presence.

Note by Aditya Ranjan
8 months, 4 weeks ago

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Interesting question but I wonder if you've really reduced the confinement volume to \(V - dV.\) What happens after you stop observing, is the particle allowed to explore \(dV\) once again?

Josh Silverman Staff - 8 months, 2 weeks ago

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Thanks for your reply. I've finally seen it! To answer your question it can be both ways. But in 8 months, I've got a bit more. It will apparently lead to superluminal info transfer. Take two cases you observe or do not observe. If you observe then you change the probability (of finding the electron) at some points instantaneously unless the wavefunction is a constant function. So this could transmit data. I think it is similar to quantum eraser experiment but I couldn't understand its solution. So will you please explain it to me? I've read that we need to match data on either side to make sense of the result. But rather we could take n such setups with 1 electron in each than 1 setup with n electron in it.

Aditya Ranjan - 6 days, 15 hours ago

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