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About \(x^y=y^x\)

Consider the equation \[x^y=y^x\] and it is required to find ALL solutions \((x,y)\) for this equation,

It is obvious that all ordered pairs \((x,x)\), i.e., \(y=x \ne 0\) is a trivial set of solutions. (Here, I am not sure if \(x=y=0\) can be considered as a solution!!)

In addition, the set \(x=\alpha^{\frac{1}{\alpha-1}},y=\alpha x\), for some real (not sure if complex works) value of \(\alpha \ne 1,0\), would also fit in as solutions.

Are there any solutions which do not fit into the above two categories? Is it possible to prove otherwise?

Note by Janardhanan Sivaramakrishnan
1 year, 11 months ago

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There are solutions that do not fit. There will be a negative real solution as long as \(y=\frac{a}{b}>1\), and there might be 2 negative real solutions when \(y=\frac{a}{b}<1\), where \(a\) is an even number and \(b\) is an odd number. I haven't actually studied this in detail yet.

From what I got so far, numerically, there would be 2 negative real solutions when \(y=\frac{a}{b}\), \(k_c<y<1\), \(0.752688172043<k_c<0.757894736842\)

Julian Poon - 1 year, 11 months ago

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I do not even restricting \(x,y\) to be real numbers.

Take \(\alpha = -1\), we get \(x=i=e^{\frac{\pi}{2}i},y=-i=e^{\frac{-\pi}{2}i}\) and

thus \(x^y=e^{\frac{\pi}{2}i \times (-i)}=e^{\frac{\pi}{2}}\)

and also \(y^x=e^{\frac{-\pi}{2}i \times (i)}=e^{\frac{\pi}{2}}\)

Janardhanan Sivaramakrishnan - 1 year, 11 months ago

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Related: soumava's algorithm

Agnishom Chattopadhyay - 1 year, 8 months ago

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Comment deleted Dec 15, 2015

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That's the same as the second condition, just substitute \(\alpha=\frac{1}{\beta -1}\)

Julian Poon - 1 year, 11 months ago

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LOL, was trying to figure out why it seemed similar. Thanks.

Sharky Kesa - 1 year, 11 months ago

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\(\Large 2^4=4^2\)

Nihar Mahajan - 1 year, 11 months ago

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This also fits the pattern. Take \(\alpha = 2\), \(x=2^{\frac{1}{2-1}}=2,y=2*2=4\).

Janardhanan Sivaramakrishnan - 1 year, 11 months ago

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