Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

An algebra conjecture: y^2 = ax^2 + b

I once had this idea that the equation \( y^2 = ax^2 + b \), where a, b, x and y are natural numbers, would have either infinite answers \((x,y)\) or no answer (in other words, it has not a finite positive number of answers). I think that this is false when "a" is a squared number, and I found a proof for a = 2 and a = 3, but I have not found the proof for the rest of numbers ( a = 5 for example ).

Has anyone an idea of how we could prove this (or prove this false if it is false)? I leave you the proof of a = 2,3 as a challenge :)

Note by Esteban Gomezllata
4 years, 10 months ago

No vote yet
10 votes

  Easy Math Editor

MarkdownAppears as
*italics* or _italics_ italics
**bold** or __bold__ bold

- bulleted
- list

  • bulleted
  • list

1. numbered
2. list

  1. numbered
  2. list
Note: you must add a full line of space before and after lists for them to show up correctly
paragraph 1

paragraph 2

paragraph 1

paragraph 2

[example link](https://brilliant.org)example link
> This is a quote
This is a quote
    # I indented these lines
    # 4 spaces, and now they show
    # up as a code block.

    print "hello world"
# I indented these lines
# 4 spaces, and now they show
# up as a code block.

print "hello world"
MathAppears as
Remember to wrap math in \( ... \) or \[ ... \] to ensure proper formatting.
2 \times 3 \( 2 \times 3 \)
2^{34} \( 2^{34} \)
a_{i-1} \( a_{i-1} \)
\frac{2}{3} \( \frac{2}{3} \)
\sqrt{2} \( \sqrt{2} \)
\sum_{i=1}^3 \( \sum_{i=1}^3 \)
\sin \theta \( \sin \theta \)
\boxed{123} \( \boxed{123} \)

Comments

Sort by:

Top Newest

It will always have infinite solutions. Look carefully, its a hyperbola. I think it holds good for all natural numbers as you say, even squares

Harshit Kapur - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

@Harshit Note the extra condition "\(x\) and \(y\) are natural numbers", which makes this problem more difficult that talking about the graph, since we do not know when it will pass through a lattice point. Once again \( \frac {3}{2} = \sqrt{\frac {3}{2} } ^2\) is not considered a square.

Calvin Lin Staff - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

Its represents a hyperbolic curve hence will have infinite solutions

Saurabh Dubey - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

@Saurabh Be careful, Esteban is only interested in integer solutions. For example, the hyperbola \( y = \frac {1}{x}\) only has 2 integer solutions.

Calvin Lin Staff - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

@Esteban. I think you mean "(in other words, No answers)". It clearly either has infinite answers, or a finite number of answers.

Calvin Lin Staff - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

This is trivial, just use properties of Pell-Equations.

Lawrence Sun - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

@Lawrence Thank you for the information, but I think to have understood that Pell-Equations require "b" to be 1. For some other values of "b", even with "a" being a non-square number, it had no solutions (below 2000 or 20000; I made a simulation to see patterns)

Esteban Gomezllata - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

@Esteban If you understood how to deal with Pell Equation for \(b=1\) through the fundamental solution, think about how this idea can be extended to \( b\neq 1\). In particular, the case \(b=-1\) is very often used. Note that it is often hard to determine if a fundamental solution exists in these other cases.

Calvin Lin Staff - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

Clearly you don't understand them well enough if you believe you need \( b=1 \)... using very basic ideas the equation \(x^2 - dy^2 = a \) for \(d\) not a perfect square has infinitely many solutions iff it has at least one solution.

Lawrence Sun - 4 years, 10 months ago

Log in to reply

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...