Try to solve it 2

limx1x+x2+x3++xnnx1= ?\large \lim_{x\to1} \frac{x+x^2+x^3+\ldots +x^n-n}{\sqrt x-1} = \ ?

Note by Abdulrahman El Shafei
3 years, 9 months ago

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Without L'Hôpital's rule

Rationalize the denominator by multiplying the expression with x+1x+1\frac{\sqrt{x} + 1} {\sqrt{x} + 1}. Distribute the nn and rewrite the expression as

limx1(x1)+(x21)+(x31)++(xn1)x1(x+1) \lim _{ x \to 1 } \frac{ (x - 1) + (x^{2} - 1) + (x^{3} - 1) + \cdots + (x^{n} - 1) }{x -1} \cdot (\sqrt{x} + 1)

=limx1(x1x1+x21x1+x31x1++xn1x1)(x+1) = \lim _{ x \to 1 } \left( \frac{ x - 1 } { x -1 } + \frac{ x^{2} - 1 } { x -1 } + \frac{ x^{3} - 1 } { x -1 } + \cdots + \frac{ x^{n} - 1 } { x -1 }\right) \cdot (\sqrt{x} + 1)

=limx1((1)+(1+x)+(1+x+x2)+(1+x+x2+x3)++(1+x+x2+x3++xn1))(x+1) = \lim _{ x \to 1 } \left( (1) + (1 + x) + (1 + x + x^{2}) + (1 + x + x^{2} + x^{3}) + \cdots + (1 + x + x^{2} + x^{3} + \cdots + x^{n-1}) \right) \cdot (\sqrt{x} + 1)

Now solve by substitution:

=(1+2+3++n)(1+1)=n(n+1) = ( 1 + 2 + 3 + \cdots + n) \cdot (1 + 1) = \boxed{n(n+1)}

Pranshu Gaba - 3 years, 9 months ago

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Amazing solution! :)

John Frank - 3 years, 5 months ago

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n2+nn^{2}+n???

Aditya Kumar - 3 years, 9 months ago

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Did you use L.Hospital's Rule ?

Abdulrahman El Shafei - 3 years, 9 months ago

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Yes. Can u prove the L.hospital rule?

Aditya Kumar - 3 years, 9 months ago

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n(n+1)

Vincent Miller Moral - 3 years, 9 months ago

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Did you use L.Hospital's Rule ?

Abdulrahman El Shafei - 3 years, 9 months ago

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Yes. However I cannot post my solution. My Latex skills s*cks. Sorry.

Vincent Miller Moral - 3 years, 9 months ago

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n(n+1) May be thats the answer. If it is correct please notify.

Mukul sharma - 3 years, 9 months ago

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Did you use L.Hospital's Rule ?

Abdulrahman El Shafei - 3 years, 9 months ago

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n(n+1)

Akshay Singh Sengar - 3 years, 9 months ago

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Did you use L.Hospital's Rule ?

Abdulrahman El Shafei - 3 years, 9 months ago

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n(n+1)

Jahid Rafi - 3 years ago

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Since this is an indeterminate form of the 00\dfrac{0}{0} form, we can simply use the L.Hospital's Rule to evaluate the given limit, which is as you follow:

\[\begin{array}{} & \lim_{x\to1} \dfrac{x+x^2+x^3+\ldots +x^n-n}{\sqrt x-1} \\ & = \lim_{x \to 1} \dfrac{1+2x+3x^2+\ldots +nx^{n-1}}{\dfrac{1}{2 \sqrt x}} \\ & = n(n+1) \end{array} \]

Sandeep Bhardwaj - 3 years, 9 months ago

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There is an answer without using L.Hospital's Rule ,....can u find it ?

Abdulrahman El Shafei - 3 years, 9 months ago

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There will be no difference in the answer whether you solve it using L.Hospital's rule or not. But yeah, there obviously exists a way to evaluate it without using L.Hospital's rule, as Pranshu did. And notice that the answer is still the same.

Sandeep Bhardwaj - 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Sandeep Bhardwaj We could just use L'Hopital's rule but sometimes we can search about another answer ...I was looking for an approach that does not use this rule and I am sorry I didn't mention , but your solution still elegant :))

Abdulrahman El Shafei - 3 years, 9 months ago

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n(n+1)

C Anshul - 1 year, 1 month ago

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