How I decide to spend my Sunday morning - (3)

"This is the story of a man, of a husband of a beautiful wife, of a father of two children, of completeness of himself. But sadly, a child of no one.

He spent his first days, months and years in an orphanage that was unknown to him although that was his (and several other children's) home.

One day, his parents' caretaker was cleaning out their home when she found their wills. In both of them said that their child was in an orphanage across the country, at the outskirts, near the coast. It was in everyone's dream as the place to live after retirement for the rest of their lives.

She saw him sleeping peacefully while the other kids were having fun in the sun. All of the workers there told her that he was the most adorable and helpful kid they have ever met. He was loved by everyone. So the moment he said goodbye to everyone and promised he would write a letter for them every two months, they were unhappy because they loved him ever so dearly. And delighted because he found a home and he would never forget them. He really did, he wrote letters and postcards and sent to them for most of his life.

He was brought up from then by her. She loved her sincerely. She was the perfect parent for any child although she was not one of them.

He was raised in a palace, which his parents' previous home, where chandeliers and candelabrums filled the rooms with light. Like the sun shining on the outdoors of the Earth, where he had never stepped foot on.

There was a reason, a conflict was going between two countries which shared borders with one another. Between them were untouched woods that was discovered to contain large amounts of rare minerals and findings that would be the framework for building massive structures with the purpose of providing the homeless with a place to live and work. (Let's be accurate here, this was another thoroughly calculated plan of the government to take money from the citizens to spend on properties most people had not ever dream of.)

The battle began with the primitives near the borders and their tools, then the military forces with cutting-edge-technology weapons. And then, he worked as the ambassador-in-residence of somewhere you might not even hear the name of. His job was to convince the presidents of the two countries to stop the conflict (while secretly and unknowingly helping his homeland to take the unbroken forests and using all of the potentials it could offer).

Although he was never outside, he knew how to separate the too-good-to-be-true myths from what is called reality. His caretaker had taught him how to do so. And when he stepped out of the door, he was already prepared for any challenges thrown at him, even death. He could not win against death, unquestionably. But he did not lose either.

Do you know that he had servants? They would serve him breakfast, lunch and dinner. They would watch him as he played the piano, studied three-dimensional geometry and slept in his Caesar size bed. They would be awake at midnight watching out for any criminals sneaking around the halls.

But the most important part is that they had fun with him, they were being treated as unique individuals and not robots. The caretaker even encouraged the servants to live in the mansion with the caregiver and her child. She provided them with rooms spacious enough for their families to live in. Everyone agreed, certainly.

He even celebrated their birthdays, he was the groomsman of their weddings, he even cried during their relatives' funerals.

And because of that, they decided to give him something extraordinary for Christmas. They only got a few minutes to prepare for the present in his bedroom while he was having a delicious chocolate dessert at the dining room for dinner.

He walked toward the master bedroom and wondered why the house was not lightened brightly in this particular day. He was going to have a talk (more like a lecture) with his servants. He turned on all of the switches which were installed next to the master bedroom. And he was astonished, who wasn't?

A train was going from his bedroom, past the library, through the halls, and from the conservatory and the observatory to the living room. There were so many rooms that he did not and will not know what they were for. But he could accept them as stations for his beloved train.

He thanked his servants for being here when he was depressed and discouraged and when he was happy and satisfied. Thanks for being here and for being yourself. He thanked his caregiver (Let's call her the parent from this point on.) for being his parent, his teacher, his entertainer..."

"Why don't you tell me more? I am curious about what happens next in the story right now."

"We need to go now if we do not want another train to crash into us."

"The truth is, this is the last train. The railway is going to shut down tomorrow. No one wants to travel by train anymore, personal transportation is becoming more and more conventional with people who want and need to go their destination fast. So enjoy your last moments living in the past. We need to move with our lives, to the future. There is no need to get this train going properly right now."


To be continued. I know that posting literature on a website based around math and science is not worth it. But it is worth a try.

Note by Thành Đạt Lê
9 months, 2 weeks ago

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1 vote

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This is no longer a puzzle, Henry U. You can enjoy reading the document.

Thành Đạt Lê - 9 months, 2 weeks ago

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A really nice story you have written there!! I enjoyed reading it.

Henry U - 9 months, 2 weeks ago

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Thanks. It's actually a really short story if you crossed out all out of the rambling.

Thành Đạt Lê - 9 months, 2 weeks ago

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@Thành Đạt Lê I might be writing one right now. Just wait.

Thành Đạt Lê - 9 months, 2 weeks ago

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@Thành Đạt Lê Now I'm curious

Henry U - 9 months, 2 weeks ago

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@Henry U Just wait.

Thành Đạt Lê - 9 months, 2 weeks ago

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@Thành Đạt Lê While waiting, I have written a poem myelf.

Henry U - 9 months, 2 weeks ago

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