Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

Learn Trigonometry in One Day

Hello Brilliantitians, I've written an article called "Learn Trigonometry in One Day," which I posted here. Share this with anyone you think may want to learn trigonometry! :)

Note by Cody Johnson
3 years ago

No vote yet
1 vote

Comments

Sort by:

Top Newest

Nice job with this. But the area formula isn't \(A = \dfrac12 ab \cos C,\) it's \(A = \dfrac12 ab \sin C.\) Michael Tang · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Michael Tang Oh crap, how could I make such a stupid typo! Cody Johnson · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Cody Johnson Ha ha yeah i saw it too. Mardokay Mosazghi · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

I read through the whole thing [except for the 'solutions to the exercises' part]

Here's what I think.

1) It's concise, brief and to-the-point. This can be both good and bad. It would be unfair to assume that someone can learn trigonometry completely from scratch by reading your article. A person needs to have a little background on trigonometry before they can read your article.

2) The way you defined sines and cosines of angles in chapter 1 makes sines and cosines only non-negative. So exercise 1.1 should not ask the reader to prove that \(\sin\theta\) and \(\cos\theta\) are never less than \(-1\).

3) In chapter 2, I'm not sure what you mean by radians are unitless. The radian itself is a unit. It is the unit of angular measure. And the radian does have a symbol, the superscript c [\(2\pi^{c}\)]. But people do not use it as it may give rise to confusion.

4) I'm not totally sure how you do it in the USA, but here we learn complex numbers way after we learn basic trig. Using Euler's formula to derive trig identities is probably not the best way to teach people who are learning trig for the first time.

5) Other than that, I think it's quite well-written with enough diagrams and those are really important while learning trig.

I see that you have other articles on academia. I'm looking forward to reading them later today. Mursalin Habib · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Mursalin Habib

  1. Thanks :D
  2. Fixed
  3. Radians are ratios
  4. I think I'll keep this anyways because it's so elegant :P
  5. Thanks :D
Cody Johnson · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Cody Johnson

Radians are ratios

I didn't say that they weren't. But the radian is an SI-derived unit. It's dimensionless.

Here's Wikipedia to back me up.

Imgur

Imgur

The main issue I had was the sentence "radians are unitless" since they are units that measure angles. Mursalin Habib · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Mursalin Habib Radians are unitless... we know that \(s=r\theta\) where \(s\) is arc length, \(r\) is radius, and \(\theta\) is angle in radians. Therefore, \(\theta\) is unitless.

On your very same Wikipedia page,

As the ratio of two lengths, the radian is a "pure number" that needs no unit symbol, and in mathematical writing the symbol "rad" is almost always omitted.

Cody Johnson · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Cody Johnson Notice that I didn't disagree with anything you said.

\(s=\frac{\pi}{180}r\theta\) where \(\theta\) is in degrees. Therefore \(\theta\) is unitless?

Neither \(\theta\) is unitless. Both \(\theta\)'s have a dimensionless unit.

To say radians are unitless is the same as saying that meters are unitless. Both meters and radians measure a measurable physical quantity. Meters measure length, displacement; radians measure angles, angular displacement. And that's what units do, don't they? They measure stuff.

The only difference between the meter and the radian is one of them has dimensions while the other one doesn't.

It can also be argued that "pure numbers" have units. \(1\) is the unit for positive integers. \(\pm 1\), \(\pm i\) are the units for Gaussian integers.

As the ratio of two lengths, the radian is a "pure number" that needs no unit symbol

I agree. It needs no unit symbol. But does not mean that it is not a unit. A degree is also the ratio of two lengths times a constant.

It all boils down to what you mean by a unit. To me a unit is a standard amount of a physical quantity. A radian is specifically that. It just happens that the physical quantity it represents has no dimensions.


I didn't want to comment on this anymore. But I wanted to see how the "backfire effect" worked and this seems like a perfect illustration of that. Mursalin Habib · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Mursalin Habib Oh I understand now, thanks! :D Cody Johnson · 2 years, 11 months ago

Log in to reply

GJ CJ ! Aditya Raut · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

Awesome article! I am new to trigonometry and it has helped me a lot. Thank you for taking the time to write this. :) Guendabiaani Guenda · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

It's ironic how I taught a few trigonometry and complex number classes to middle and high school students at MIT last week (taught it 3 times). These seminars were one 1 hour long, each. (Not a series, separate classes) and the topics I covered and the approach I used was almost the same as those you cover in your article. Nice work! Do you mind if I use this as a handout next time I teach this class? Ahaan Rungta · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Ahaan Rungta Sure! Cody Johnson · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Cody Johnson Thanks! Ahaan Rungta · 2 years, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

@Ahaan Rungta @Cody Johnson @Ahaan Rungta Can you add these notes to the Trigonometry section on the Wiki? Thanks! Calvin Lin Staff · 2 years, 9 months ago

Log in to reply

Great work Cody! Sagnik Saha · 2 years, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

it is comprehensive for beginners Damini Damini · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

Where is the article? I'd like tor read it, but I can't find it. Krys Baker · 2 years, 11 months ago

Log in to reply

On page 6, the area formula of triangle \(A\) can be confused with the angle \(A\). You can use \( [ \triangle ABC ]\) instead. Other than that is amazing. ^__^ Samuraiwarm Tsunayoshi · 2 years, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

Amazing well done and explanatory really helped thanks Mardokay Mosazghi · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

Thank you all for your feedback. I will edit and update the article. Cody Johnson · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Cody Johnson Thanks Cody for the trig lesson. Ritu Roy · 2 years, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

I'll nitpick a bit, but you wrote, "Similarly, \(\sin\theta >0\) for \(0 <\theta < 180^{\circ}\) and \(180^{\circ}<\theta < 360^{\circ}\)." You omitted "\(\sin\theta<0\) for" after the word and. You also omitted the degree sign above the \(0\), i.e. it is \(0^{\circ} <\theta < 180^{\circ}\). Mathh Mathh · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

@Mathh Mathh Haha, I fixed it. Cody Johnson · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

I like the article but it can't teach you trigonometry in one day. Agnishom Chattopadhyay · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

A good article but a bit concise for beginners who actually learn from scratch. Asking the proof for extended sine rule as a problem was a really good exercise. Kudos!! Looking forward to advanced topics :) Krishna Ar · 3 years ago

Log in to reply

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...