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List of Primes

This is a list of the first 1000 primes, arranged in 10 columns with a space every 10 rows.

2357111317192329
31374143475359616771
7379838997101103107109113
127131137139149151157163167173
179181191193197199211223227229
233239241251257263269271277281
283293307311313317331337347349
353359367373379383389397401409
419421431433439443449457461463
467479487491499503509521523541
547557563569571577587593599601
607613617619631641643647653659
661673677683691701709719727733
739743751757761769773787797809
811821823827829839853857859863
877881883887907911919929937941
94795396797197798399199710091013
1019102110311033103910491051106110631069
1087109110931097110311091117112311291151
1153116311711181118711931201121312171223
1229123112371249125912771279128312891291
1297130113031307131913211327136113671373
1381139914091423142714291433143914471451
1453145914711481148314871489149314991511
1523153115431549155315591567157115791583
1597160116071609161316191621162716371657
1663166716691693169716991709172117231733
1741174717531759177717831787178918011811
1823183118471861186718711873187718791889
1901190719131931193319491951197319791987
1993199719992003201120172027202920392053
2063206920812083208720892099211121132129
2131213721412143215321612179220322072213
2221223722392243225122672269227322812287
2293229723092311233323392341234723512357
2371237723812383238923932399241124172423
2437244124472459246724732477250325212531
2539254325492551255725792591259326092617
2621263326472657265926632671267726832687
2689269326992707271127132719272927312741
2749275327672777278927912797280128032819
2833283728432851285728612879288728972903
2909291729272939295329572963296929712999
3001301130193023303730413049306130673079
3083308931093119312131373163316731693181
3187319132033209321732213229325132533257
3259327132993301330733133319332333293331
3343334733593361337133733389339134073413
3433344934573461346334673469349134993511
3517352735293533353935413547355735593571
3581358335933607361336173623363136373643
3659367136733677369136973701370937193727
3733373937613767376937793793379738033821
3823383338473851385338633877388138893907
3911391739193923392939313943394739673989
4001400340074013401940214027404940514057
4073407940914093409941114127412941334139
4153415741594177420142114217421942294231
4241424342534259426142714273428342894297
4327433743394349435743634373439143974409
4421442344414447445144574463448144834493
4507451345174519452345474549456145674583
4591459746034621463746394643464946514657
4663467346794691470347214723472947334751
4759478347874789479347994801481348174831
4861487148774889490349094919493149334937
4943495149574967496949734987499349995003
5009501150215023503950515059507750815087
5099510151075113511951475153516751715179
5189519752095227523152335237526152735279
5281529753035309532353335347535153815387
5393539954075413541754195431543754415443
5449547154775479548355015503550755195521
5527553155575563556955735581559156235639
5641564756515653565756595669568356895693
5701571157175737574157435749577957835791
5801580758135821582758395843584958515857
5861586758695879588158975903592359275939
5953598159876007601160296037604360476053
6067607360796089609161016113612161316133
6143615161636173619761996203621162176221
6229624762576263626962716277628762996301
6311631763236329633763436353635963616367
6373637963896397642164276449645164696473
6481649165216529654765516553656365696571
6577658165996607661966376653665966616673
6679668966916701670367096719673367376761
6763677967816791679368036823682768296833
6841685768636869687168836899690769116917
6947694969596961696769716977698369916997
7001701370197027703970437057706970797103
7109712171277129715171597177718771937207
7211721372197229723772437247725372837297
7307730973217331733373497351736973937411
7417743374517457745974777481748774897499
7507751775237529753775417547754975597561
7573757775837589759176037607762176397643
7649766976737681768776917699770377177723
7727774177537757775977897793781778237829
7841785378677873787778797883790179077919

Note by Arron Kau
3 years, 6 months ago

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Just a fun fact: 73 is the 21st prime and, 37 is the 12th prime! Get it?

Danny Kills - 2 years, 7 months ago

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Hahahaha. Such a swapping identity.

John Michael Gogola - 1 year, 10 months ago

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How long did this take you? @Arron Kau

Sharky Kesa - 3 years, 4 months ago

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We can write a java program to get the first thousand or even I first lakh prime number. :-)

Andy R - 3 years, 3 months ago

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BTW, lakhs are only used in India. The rest of the world uses 100000s.

Sharky Kesa - 3 years, 3 months ago

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@Sharky Kesa What u want to say...100000 and lakhs are same

Kushal Shah - 3 years, 3 months ago

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@Kushal Shah The term lakhs is used only in India. Other refer it to as 100 thousands or 100k.

Aryan Gaikwad - 2 years, 7 months ago

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@Aryan Gaikwad lakh is also used in other countries like Pakistan !!!

Syed Baqir - 2 years, 3 months ago

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@Sharky Kesa I didnt understand this statement

Kushal Shah - 3 years, 3 months ago

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@Kushal Shah More people will understand 100000s rather than lakhs.

Sharky Kesa - 3 years, 3 months ago

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@Sharky Kesa Bro, you just write down 10^5 . check the number of Zeroes. 10^5= 1 Lakh; 10^6= 1 Million

Subhajit Ghosh - 2 years, 11 months ago

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@Subhajit Ghosh But he has written it correctly.

Anuj Shikarkhane - 2 years, 11 months ago

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@Subhajit Ghosh I did write \(10^5\).

Sharky Kesa - 2 years, 11 months ago

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@Sharky Kesa Now I got you,you write 10^5 instead of 1 lakh and told that it is called lakh only in India. Never mind I got it on other way. Never mind.

Subhajit Ghosh - 2 years, 11 months ago

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@Sharky Kesa "Lakh" is something that might come out of a drunk Vulcan's mouth.

Venture Hi - 3 years ago

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It was actually Calvin who created this, so I don't know if he generated it or if he copied it from another source. I just posted it. :)

Arron Kau Staff - 3 years, 4 months ago

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I really hope he didn't just generate it. :O

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 4 months ago

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@Finn Hulse It's not that hard to generate, btw. Here's a quick and dirty Sieve of Eratosthenes in Python:

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primes = [2]

def check_prime(number,listofprimes):
    isprime = True
    for prime in listofprimes:
        if number % prime ==0:
            isprime=False
    return isprime

while len(primes) < 1000: 
    test = primes[-1]+1
    isprime = False
    while isprime == False: 
        if check_prime(test,primes):
            isprime = True
            primes.append(test)
        test += 1
print primes

It runs in about .5 seconds on my laptop if you only want the first 1000 primes.

Arron Kau Staff - 3 years, 4 months ago

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@Arron Kau I think this is more short and sweet

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for prime in range(2, 1000):
    for i in range(2, p):
        if prime % i == 0:
            break
    else:
        print prime,

Mehul Chaturvedi - 2 years, 7 months ago

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@Mehul Chaturvedi What most people (which used to include me till 2 months ago) don't know is how much more efficient the code for isprime can be made with a simple modification

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boolean isprime(long int a)
{
if(a%2==0)
return false;

for(int 1=3;i<a/2; i+=2)
if(a%i==0)
return false;

return true;
} 

Vishnu C - 2 years, 3 months ago

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@Mehul Chaturvedi @Calvin Lin and @Arron Kau how is this one??

Mehul Chaturvedi - 2 years, 7 months ago

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@Mehul Chaturvedi That prints the primes all the way up to 1000, not the first 1000 primes.

Sharky Kesa - 2 years, 7 months ago

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@Arron Kau That's actually pretty cool. I didn't know you could code. What was your major in college?

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 4 months ago

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@Finn Hulse Believe it or not, English. :)

Arron Kau Staff - 3 years, 4 months ago

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@Arron Kau HAHAHAHAHAHAHA I'm sorry that's just really funny. Minor?

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 4 months ago

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sieve of eratosthenes

Vederis Leunardus - 3 years, 4 months ago

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He probably copied it from somewhere.

Danny Kills - 3 years, 4 months ago

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You can easily find these numbers on Wikipedia, then put them into Microsoft Excell to create this chart.

Nathan Blanco - 3 years, 4 months ago

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Very useful list @Arron Kau and thanx a lot

Umang Vasani - 3 years, 4 months ago

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bro, how is this useful?? will u memorize the??!

Pankaj Joshi - 3 years, 4 months ago

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Thank you! ;)

Vignesh Sundararaj - 3 years, 6 months ago

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Okay then...

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 6 months ago

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Okay can

King Zhang Zizhong - 3 years, 4 months ago

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Let us define a "Very Curious Number" as an odd "Curious Number".
If such a number exists, what is the smallest one?

Robert DeLisle - 8 months ago

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What's a Curious Number?

Sharky Kesa - 8 months ago

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It is the thing that led me to this list of primes linked to a B.O puzzle. The item states that a positive integer is "curious" if it can not be made a prime by changing a single digit. e.g. 4 is replaced with 3, 56 can be made 57, 195 can be made 199. There are primes in every decade up to 199, so a one digit substitution is available in the last digit. But at 200 there are no primes between 201 and 209 and the lower zero must be changed otherwise divisible by 10. So 200 is the least curious number, answering the puzzle, and so are the rest of the 20x, with x even. Clearly there will be many more ending in a even digit that must be changed when there is no prime in the decade. So the idea of a "very curious number" proposed is an ODD curious number (if there is such a thing). 201 can be made 211. 203 can be made 223. 207 can be made 257. 209 can be made 269. None of them is curious. Being odd makes a big difference.

Robert DeLisle - 8 months ago

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@Arron Kau If you want to see the list of first 100,000 primes, you can see it here

Anuj Shikarkhane - 2 years, 11 months ago

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too uuuusseeeeeffffffuuuuulllll

Deepthi Prakash - 3 years, 1 month ago

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thanx for this......

Swapnil Nerkar - 3 years, 3 months ago

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I can't memorize that all!! very haggard

Mj Villamon - 3 years, 3 months ago

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lot of thanks bro

Probably Nayeem - 3 years, 4 months ago

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Very Useful :) , Thanks Much.

Mylavarapu Lakshmi Prasanna Kumar - 3 years, 4 months ago

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superb

Nishok Palanivel - 3 years, 4 months ago

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@Akbar Arrozaq Damn, someone has had some time to kill @Finn Hulse @Sharky Kesa @Arron Kau

Elliott Macneil - 3 years, 4 months ago

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Well... Check out the code he used to generate it. :D

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 4 months ago

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Well, now that I know the code... @Finn Hulse

Elliott Macneil - 3 years, 4 months ago

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@Elliott Macneil f/u/n/n/y

Deepthi Prakash - 3 years, 1 month ago

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this is completely useless post

M.S. Saggoo - 3 years, 3 months ago

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This post has a countless amount of uses

It can be used to generate problems, such as Sean Ty's that he just posted.

It can be used to check if a number is a Fermat liar.

It also greatly lessens the amount of time wasted on tests for primes.

It can be used to solve problems such as finding the number of integers<1000 such that \(\dfrac{p-1}{2}!\pm1\equiv 0 \pmod p\)

Or if a number is \((p-1)!+1\equiv 0 \pmod p\)

Dont say that something is useless. There is a use for the smallest things in life, some of the smallest things, such as this brilliant post, can have some of the biggest purposes.

Trevor Arashiro - 3 years ago

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