Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

Points needed to determine a function

Suppose there is some unknown function, and you have to guess the equation for it. You can ask for a certain number of points of the function and then figure out what the entire thing looks like. How many points of it would you need to make sure you can induce its equation? It's seems like you would need an infinite amount, but even then, it could be a sin wave and you could be given just the maximum values of the wave crests (making it look like a straight line) or just any points (making it look like a long polynomial). Does this mean functions are characterized more than an infinite number of points?

Note by Manasa Kaniselvan
4 years, 10 months ago

No vote yet
1 vote

  Easy Math Editor

MarkdownAppears as
*italics* or _italics_ italics
**bold** or __bold__ bold

- bulleted
- list

  • bulleted
  • list

1. numbered
2. list

  1. numbered
  2. list
Note: you must add a full line of space before and after lists for them to show up correctly
paragraph 1

paragraph 2

paragraph 1

paragraph 2

[example link](https://brilliant.org)example link
> This is a quote
This is a quote
    # I indented these lines
    # 4 spaces, and now they show
    # up as a code block.

    print "hello world"
# I indented these lines
# 4 spaces, and now they show
# up as a code block.

print "hello world"
MathAppears as
Remember to wrap math in \( ... \) or \[ ... \] to ensure proper formatting.
2 \times 3 \( 2 \times 3 \)
2^{34} \( 2^{34} \)
a_{i-1} \( a_{i-1} \)
\frac{2}{3} \( \frac{2}{3} \)
\sqrt{2} \( \sqrt{2} \)
\sum_{i=1}^3 \( \sum_{i=1}^3 \)
\sin \theta \( \sin \theta \)
\boxed{123} \( \boxed{123} \)

Comments

There are no comments in this discussion.

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...