Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

Proof of fermats theorem in some simple way

Fermats theorem

Note by Hardik Chandak
4 years, 1 month ago

No vote yet
5 votes

Comments

Sort by:

Top Newest

Are you looking for a simple proof of Fermat's Little Theorem or Fermat's Last Theorem or one of the many other theorems named after Fermat?

Jimmy Kariznov - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

FERMATS LAST THEOREM

Hardik Chandak - 1 year, 7 months ago

Log in to reply

I'm pretty sure Fermat's Last Theorem

Hahn Lheem - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

Fermat's Little Theorem can be proved using induction.

Michael Tang - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

Can u prove it by induction plz show?

Tushar Gautam - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

It's not by induction, but an easy proof of Fermat's little theorem would be that \(x^p \equiv (1+1+1+...+1)^p \equiv (1^p+1^p+...+1^p) \equiv x \pmod p \) with \(x\) times number \(1\). This is possible because in Pascal's triangle on prime rows the numbers are multiples of p except for the first and last terms which are \(1\). This can be easily proven by using binomial formula.

Michael May - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

I can give you a proof .

Ukkash Asharaf - 2 years, 11 months ago

Log in to reply

Okay get your calculators and try this:

\(\sqrt[12]{1782^{12}+1841^{12}}\)

\(=1922\) right?

So this implies that \({1782^{12}+1841^{12}=1922^{12}}\)

Does this disprove Fermat's Last Theorem?

Of course not!

The calculator is wrong.

Ching Z - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

BTW: A quick check to see that \(1782^{12}+1841^{12} \neq 1922^{12}\) is to note that the left side is odd whereas the right side is even.

Jimmy Kariznov - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

Took some time to realize... The actual answer is \(1921.99999995586722540291132837029507293441170657370868230...\) Unfortunately, most calculators round the answer.

Vincent Tandya - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

If I remember correctly, that "equation" was from a Homer Simpson episode.

Daniel Liu - 4 years, 1 month ago

Log in to reply

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...