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Question about chemistry

Hi, I am a 11th grade student and I am interested in learning chemistry. Although I learn chemistry at school but my skills aren't very good, so I want to find some books for beginners which can help me improve my knowledge. If anyone know good chemistry books for beginners, can you suggest for me some? Thank you very much. I also confuse about the difference between chemistry and physics, what do we study in chemistry but don't study in physics? And what are the main topics or fields which appear in chemistry. My last question is that does chemistry require firm mathematical skills?

Note by Anh Huy Nguyen
3 years, 9 months ago

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I can only suggest for Organic Chemistry. Not sure what kind of books you have access to but you should easily get this one. The book is Organic Chemistry by Morrison and Boyd. I used this for my OChem course and this book really helped a lot. Pranav Arora · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Pranav Arora Do you know the name of the topics which appear in Chemistry? I just only know some, for example biochemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, ... Anh Huy Nguyen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Anh Huy Nguyen check this out: http://www.uwlax.edu/chemistry/html/types.htm Priyankar Kumar · 3 years, 9 months ago

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well Anh chemistry gives some understanding to matter i.e smallest particle atom.chemistry is simple chemical reactions occurring in our day to day life.for beginners organic &inorganic chemistry,atoms and molecules can be suggested Sowtanika Kumar · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Sowtanika Kumar Thank you Sowtanika, but I still confuse about the topics that I will I learn if I go deeper into the Chemistry field in college? Anh Huy Nguyen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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here is how i understand the distinction between them, For starters both physics and chemistry are part of physical science, Physics studies how the universe works,and interact with each other,and why they behave the way they do, Chemistry, built upon concepts from physics, addresses phenomena associated with the structure, of composition,it also connects physics with other fields like biology There are more like a subset of each other, Mathematics being the top,then physics,then chemistry and branching to other fields Beakal Tiliksew · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Beakal Tiliksew Can you explain for me the part "Chemistry, built upon concepts from physics", which parts in Chemistry that relate to Physics? And do you know the name of the topics which appear in Chemistry? I just only know some, for example biochemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, ... Anh Huy Nguyen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Anh Huy Nguyen Quantum mechanics for example,is a vital mutual subset of both chemistry and physics. Thaddeus Abiy · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Thaddeus Abiy So if I want to learn chemistry in colleges and universities (take a degree in chemistry), will I learn all fields in chemistry or just the one that I choose? Anh Huy Nguyen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Anh Huy Nguyen In undergraduate chemistry, you will learn fields such as physical, analytical, biochemistry and organic chemistry. You will also learn practical applications of chemistry such as instrumentation. I don't know if this applies to other universities but in my university chemistry undergraduates have to take differential calculus before taking (required) quantum chemistry.

There are universities that offer specific fields for undergraduates such as Biochemistry, but if you want to specialize in a certain field take up M.S. or Ph.D. Ludho Madrid · 3 years, 9 months ago

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I don't think op tandon will be available in vietnam or either available by internet... Gabriel Singhal · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Gabriel Singhal She will buy from india Karan Kewalramani · 3 years, 9 months ago

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Chemistry requires mathematical skills because it has fields that needs a firm background in math like chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, and analytical chemistry (equilibrium, titration, etc.) Chemistry focuses more on the properties of matter from microscopic scale (atoms) to microscopic scale and its interactions. Chemistry and Physics intertwine in some topics like thermodynamics and nuclear chem, but physics can deal with a lot of stuff other than tangible matter such as relativity. Also, physics has fields that are in smaller scale than chemistry such as particle physics.

If you want to learn general chemistry, I suggest "Chemistry: The Central Science" (12th Edition) by Brown et al. and "Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change" (5th Edition) by Silberberg et al.

If you want to learn general chemistry in a more advanced approach, I suggest "Chemical Principles: The Quest for Insight" (5th Edition) by P. Atkins and L. Jones, and "General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications" (10th Edition) by Petrucci et al. Ludho Madrid · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Ludho Madrid *fields that need. Sorry! Ludho Madrid · 3 years, 9 months ago

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TRY PAULA Bruice Organic Chemistry.... IT's Addictive!!! Advitiya Brijesh · 3 years, 9 months ago

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Chemistry doesn't need too many math skills, but look up stoichiometry Brian Reinhart · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Brian Reinhart I think stoichiometry is a small branch in the also chemistry because each topics (for instance organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, ...) also include chemical reactions. But I'm not sure that I'm right. Anh Huy Nguyen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Anh Huy Nguyen You are right. But stoichiometry is more than just reactions. It helps in quantitative analysis of chemical reactions. Like knowing how much of a particular reactant will yield how much of a product and all that. Chemistry is an experimental science. Math is just a tool which you may need to express quantities, and analyse data. So if you are serious about it, you can pursue it as a career. Priyankar Kumar · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Priyankar Kumar As for books, I suggest Raymond Chang's General Chemistry (McGrawHill). Its good for beginners. I am a beginner in chemistry too, and I found the book really interesting. I think you should start with General Chemistry before moving on to Organic and other branches. Priyankar Kumar · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Priyankar Kumar So if I want to learn chemistry in colleges and universities (take a degree in chemistry), will I learn all fields in chemistry or just the one that I choose? Anh Huy Nguyen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Anh Huy Nguyen I think they teach at-least the basics of all branches of chem in any chem course you may choose to take. But the emphasis is more on the branch you have chosen. Priyankar Kumar · 3 years, 9 months ago

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You can refer op tandon solomman jd lee. And yes chem also requires good mathematical skills Karan Kewalramani · 3 years, 9 months ago

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