Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

Space question

Is there any probability that our sun is in binary system with another star within our galaxy ?

Note by Vivek Bhal
4 years, 3 months ago

No vote yet
3 votes

  Easy Math Editor

MarkdownAppears as
*italics* or _italics_ italics
**bold** or __bold__ bold

- bulleted
- list

  • bulleted
  • list

1. numbered
2. list

  1. numbered
  2. list
Note: you must add a full line of space before and after lists for them to show up correctly
paragraph 1

paragraph 2

paragraph 1

paragraph 2

[example link](https://brilliant.org)example link
> This is a quote
This is a quote
    # I indented these lines
    # 4 spaces, and now they show
    # up as a code block.

    print "hello world"
# I indented these lines
# 4 spaces, and now they show
# up as a code block.

print "hello world"
MathAppears as
Remember to wrap math in \( ... \) or \[ ... \] to ensure proper formatting.
2 \times 3 \( 2 \times 3 \)
2^{34} \( 2^{34} \)
a_{i-1} \( a_{i-1} \)
\frac{2}{3} \( \frac{2}{3} \)
\sqrt{2} \( \sqrt{2} \)
\sum_{i=1}^3 \( \sum_{i=1}^3 \)
\sin \theta \( \sin \theta \)
\boxed{123} \( \boxed{123} \)

Comments

Sort by:

Top Newest

If there were another star that formed a binary system with our star, then that star would either a) have to be far enough away that we wouldn't notice its gravitational pull on the planets in our solar system, or b) only pass through this part of its orbit very infrequently. If a is true, then why even bother calling it a binary system, since neither star affects the other? If b is true, then there would be massive disruptions to the solar system every time the second star passed through, and some planets (if not all of them) would be thrown out of their orbits, probably to be swallowed by one of the stars. The Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud would both have massive holes where the second star passed through, which we would be able to observe.

Basically, while I suppose it's still possible (in that anything is possible until proven impossible), it's very, very, very unlikely that our sun is in a binary system with another star in the galaxy and we don't know about it.

Cam Herringshaw - 4 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

That can't be the case,as the planets will become unstable and quickly get ejected

Beakal Tiliksew - 4 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

Well probably in most cases, but not in all.

Willi Tiberius - 4 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

yes there is about 200-400 billion stars in our galaxy

Christian Duncan - 4 years, 3 months ago

Log in to reply

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...