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Thermodynamics Question 2

When a gas expands adiabatically; it does work on its surroundings. But if there is no heat input to the gas, where does the energy come from to do the work?

Note by Mark Kevin Aguilar
4 years, 5 months ago

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It's the internal energy of the gas that it uses to do work in an adiabatic process.

Saurabh Dubey - 4 years, 5 months ago

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yeah that's right.......and that's why the temperature of the gas drops after adiabatic expansion as temperature is directly proportional to internal energy of the gas.........

Rajath Krishna R - 4 years, 5 months ago

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u r correct but at inversion temp the opp happens

Himank Bhalla - 4 years, 5 months ago

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You are back!!. Was the pendulum (changing value of g) question correct?

Saurabh Dubey - 4 years, 5 months ago

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@Saurabh Dubey yeah that's it.............

Rajath Krishna R - 4 years, 5 months ago

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It is due to intramolecular force existing between molecules by 'String Theory' or 'Harmonic Oscillator'!!

Subhrodipto Basu Choudhury - 4 years, 5 months ago

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from internal energy as dQ=dU+dW and dQ is 0

Tarun Bansal - 4 years, 5 months ago

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If gas expands adiabatically and if it is a free expansion no work is done by the gas....free expansion means into vaccum..since question is not that clear, will answer another question also...if it expands against a piston, definitely it has to do some work and it reduces its temperature hence uses itS internal energy...

Ajith Mohan - 7 months, 3 weeks ago

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Internal pressure of gas is more than external pressure , so gas expands without any heat input.

Aditya Pratap Rana - 2 years ago

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internal energy

Dastgir Baadshah Khan Pathan - 4 years, 5 months ago

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