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Typing latex

I have a few questions about typing LaTeX. However, I know the basics of LaTeX, but the answers to my following questions would help my LaTeX equations look better. Any kind of help is appreciated.

1) In certain submitted solutions I have seen the LaTeX equations to be aligned at the center instead of beside the text. Is there any code which aligns the equations at the center?

2) When I type summations or definite integrals in LaTeX, for example \sum{i=0}^{n} i^2 or \int{0}^{2 \pi} cos( \theta) d\theta, they appear respectively as \( \sum_{i=0}^{n} i^2\) and \( \int_{0}^{2 \pi} cos( \theta) d\theta \). Note that the subscripts and superscripts do not appear exactly above the \( \sum \) or the \( \int \) sign, but to a little right of them. However in some comments in Brilliant discussions, for example this one, I have seen that the superscripts and subscripts can be written directly above the mathematical signs. What is the code to do it?

I am asking it here only because I know it is possible, but the LaTeX guideline does not seem to answer it. Any kind of help will be appreciated. \( ☺ \)

Thanks!

Note by Sreejato Bhattacharya
3 years, 9 months ago

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\ [ latex \ ] aligns in the center and on a new line while \ ( latex \ ) aligns right or with text. At least I think so. Bob Krueger · 3 years, 9 months ago

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\displaystyle \sum_{i=0}^{n}i^2 in math brackets will appear as \( \displaystyle \sum_{i=0}^{n}i^2 \) Jatin Yadav · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Jatin Yadav \[ \displaystyle \sum_{i=0}^n i^2= \frac{n(n+1)(2n+1)}{6} \]

Thanks! Sreejato Bhattacharya · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Sreejato Bhattacharya The intention of display style is to let inline equations, i.e. those of the form \ ( \ ), be allowed to take up more than 1 line of space, for example \( \displaystyle \sum_{i=0}^n i^2 \). This could cause your paragraph of text to appear jumpy, since the subscripts and superscripts now require more line width, as you can see in this paragraph.

Conversely, since stand-along equations, i.e. those of the form \ [ \ ], already take up a chunk of their own space, and hence the equations (tend to) display as intended. It is not required to use \displaystyle (which you did in your code above) Calvin Lin Staff · 3 years, 9 months ago

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Now that your queries are answered, I would like to add that you can write "cos" in a neater way. Use \cos in your latex code i.e \( \displaystyle \cos \). You see that it looks much better than simply writing "cos" in your code. The same works for other trig functions too.

Limits can be applied to a definite integral the same way you would do for a summation. \[ \int_{0}^{1} f(x) dx \] Pranav Arora · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Pranav Arora Now I have a tip for you, instead of just appending \(dx\) to your integral, you should seperate it by \, like this:

\[ \text{\int_0^1 f(x) \, dx } \implies \int_0^1 f(x) \, dx \]

It's not really a big deal, but it does look a tiny bit nicer. Tim Vermeulen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Tim Vermeulen It does look better, thanks! Pranav Arora · 3 years, 9 months ago

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You can also add \limits to your expression, like this:

\[ \text{\sum\limits_{i=0}^n i^2 } \implies \sum\limits_{i=0}^n i^2 \] Tim Vermeulen · 3 years, 9 months ago

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@Tim Vermeulen Or use the \(\LaTeX\) \displaystyle Ashish Siva · 12 months ago

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☺☺☺☺☺☺☺☺☺☺☺☺ Ashish Siva · 12 months ago

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