Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

Weekend Wiki Party 9 - Empty Pages

This week, we're trying something a little different with the Weekend Wiki Party, and there should be something here for everyone. Below, you'll find the most visted pages in each topic on Brilliant that currently have no content.

These pages are about things that people on Brilliant want to know about, but there's currently nothing on our wiki to help them. Can you help them out by adding to these pages?

Calculus

Simple Sequences

Algebra

Absolute Value

Combinatorics

Dilworth’s Theorem

Number Theory

Perfect Numbers

Logic

Tic Tac Toe
Truth Tables

Cryptography

Vigenere Cipher
Quantum Cryptography

Computer Science

Input Output

Physics

Field Lines and Field Strength
Determining the Power put into a System

Leave a comment if you make an edit, and thanks for helping make Brilliant the best place in the world to learn math and science!

Note by Calvin Lin
1 year, 8 months ago

No vote yet
1 vote

Comments

Sort by:

Top Newest

@Calvin Lin Sir, I contributed to the "Absolute Value" Wiki.I added examples to each section , improved the definition and added some properties to the notes of absolute value.Hope you like it :) Nihar Mahajan · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Nihar Mahajan Thanks! That page is beginning to look better :) Calvin Lin Staff · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

Sir, i've contributed to the graphs of inverse trigo. can u check it?? Aditya Kumar · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

Edited out/Cleaned up \(\text{Perfect Numbers } \ddot\smile\) Pranjal Jain · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Pranjal Jain Oh yay! That page looks much better than it did the day before.

It could benefit from adding some proofs, or combining the list of properties which are mostly "it has the form \( 2^{n-1} ( 2^n - 1 ) \). Calvin Lin Staff · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

Is it okay, if I help with these pages after JEE, that is, next week? I am saving this note so that I can remember to do so. Vishwak Srinivasan · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Vishwak Srinivasan Certainly! Help at any point in time will be welcome.

All the best with JEE! Calvin Lin Staff · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Calvin Lin Thank you sir! Vishwak Srinivasan · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

A stopwatch has a least count of 0.1 seconds it does 20 oscillations in 25 seconds find error in time period Abhishek Singh · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Abhishek Singh 0.125secs? Ayanlaja Adebola · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Ayanlaja Adebola In response to ayanlaja answer, please can you tell how the answer came Abhishek Singh · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Abhishek Singh I think.....Period(T)=Time Taken/Number of oscilations.......T=25/20.....T=1.25 secs.....Since the stopwatch moves @least 0.1secs which is its reading accuracy....Error=1.25*0.1=0.125secs Ayanlaja Adebola · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

@Abhishek Singh Am i corect or wrong? Ayanlaja Adebola · 1 year, 8 months ago

Log in to reply

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...