What is a short circuit?

I know it happens when current flows between two terminals which have zero potential difference.

Can you guyz help me understand it in depth!

Note by Mayank Holmes
2 years, 5 months ago

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According to my high school knowledge, short circuit happens when the resistence is nearly zero between two terminals WITH potential difference. A large current resulted may overheat the device.

Shepherd Ng - 2 years, 5 months ago

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but zero resistance itself implies that the potential difference is zero as per the eqn. v=r * i

Mayank Holmes - 2 years, 5 months ago

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Potential difference should depend on the battery/power supply and is normally not zero. By V=I*R, as V>0 and R tends to 0, that makes I=V/R go very large.

Shepherd Ng - 2 years, 4 months ago

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Your phrasing does not make sense. Please try rephrasing the question clearly

Agnishom Chattopadhyay Staff - 2 years, 5 months ago

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Short circuit means reduction in impedance. Current in the circuit flow according to source voltage.

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Consider the current flow in an ideal wire.

Jilan Basha - 2 years ago

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