Birth season paradox

The birthday paradox is a surprising result of probability. Suppose you randomly chose 23 people and put them in a room. Then there would be a good chance \(\big(\)greater than \(\frac{1}{2}\big)\) that two of those people share a birthday (even though there are 365 days in the year).

What about birth seasons (spring, summer, fall, winter)? Suppose you randomly chose 3 people and put them in a room. Then is it true that there would be a greater than \(\frac{1}{2}\) chance that two of them share a birth season?


Note: Birth seasons do not all have the exact same likelihood. However, their likelihoods are close enough that you can assume they are equal for this problem.

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...