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Brilliant.org in the classroom

As a teacher I am looking for more ways to bring Brilliant.org into the classroom. I would like as many ideas as possible for bringing brilliant into the classroom.

I have already introduced the idea of the Apprentice, Journeyman, Adept, Magnus, and Brilliant solution writer into my classroom, as well as posting challenging problems on the blackboard to challenge students (along with crediting the user responsible for posting it). I would like a way to group students to solve problems and try to earn points as a group.

I'm all ears.


Note by Peter Michael
1 year ago

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Wow, that really excites me that you've been challenging students with these problems, and also uploading them to the Solution Writing standards that I laid out.

Here are some suggestions for activities that you could do. I don't know the standard / maturity that you're teaching, so I'm offering a spectrum of ideas. I can work with you further if you're interested:

  • Have groups of students collaborate on a wiki, since explaining material is the best way of ensuring that you understand it well. We have a system which works well, allowing the community to brainstorm on the content and deciding on how to structure the page.
  • After covering a topic, ask them to submit problems related to it, and see how the Brilliant community engages with them. Then, pick the best problems to use in your test (for extra credit). This gets them eager to think deeper about the concept, and also create interesting problems that they can challenge each other with.
  • Pick a problem that has multiple solution approaches (esp in Geometry or Combinatorics). Have them write up their solutions, and then host a discussion about the relative merits of the different approaches, and what the lessons learnt are. By making this explicit, they can start to form linkages about how different areas of math are interconnected with each other, and discover these connections for themselves.
  • Have students pick a problem that they like, and then come up with different versions of it, or even generalize the problem to a different scenario. This helps them think about the underlying mathematics concepts, and learn how to apply what they have learnt into a new situation. They can then post the problem, and see if it also engages with others.
Calvin Lin Staff · 1 year ago

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You could have Socratic Seminars in your math class. Give out a challenging math problem and see how the class as a whole works together to try and solve that problem. You can repeat this for a while so they can get the hang of it. Then you can ask the students to create their own challenging math problems and watch how other students solve said problem. You don't necessarily have to use Brilliant.org in your class. Just use some of the ideas from Brilliant.org in your math class. Ananth Jayadev · 10 months ago

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