How large did the universe become during the cosmic inflationary phase, and what was the average speed of expansion?

In March 2014, scientists at Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics found direct evidence that the universe expanded tremendously fast, 10^-35 seconds after Big Bang and lasting for a time about 10^-32 seconds. I would like to know how big the universe had become within this time of cosmic inflation and how much further has it expanded since then. Reports say it grew from the size of a billionth of a proton by 2^100 times. This calculation I believe will further bring out the importance of the cosmic inflationary phase of the universe.

Note by Archiet Dev
5 years, 8 months ago

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After this humongously rapid cosmic inflationary expansion of the early universe, it was about the size of a basketball. Thereafter, it expanded at an ordinary pace similar to what we see today.

Michael Mendrin - 5 years, 7 months ago

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Thank you sir!

Archiet Dev - 5 years, 7 months ago

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In popular media, one often gets the impression that the universe almost instantly expanded to something close to the size it is today, because it's rarely ever mentioned that it was only about the size of a basketball at the end of the inflationary phase. In fact, it's really not that easy to find this out by looking it up---we're told how old the universe was by that time, but not its size.

Michael Mendrin - 5 years, 7 months ago

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@Michael Mendrin Sir! If you don't mind I would like to ask that what you do? I mean to say that are you a researcher, professor ,mathematician,scientist ?

Archiet Dev - 5 years, 6 months ago

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you can see cosmic questions

Dinesh Nath Goswami - 5 years, 2 months ago

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