Waste less time on Facebook — follow Brilliant.
×

NMTC 2015 Ramanujan Contest Final Round

  1. ABC is a triangle in which \(R\) represents the circumradius and \(r\) represents the inradius and \(d\)represents the distance between circumcentre and incentre . Then find \(d\) in terms of \(R,r\)

  2. ABC is a triangle . Point P is on side BC . \(r_{1},r_{2},r\) are inradii of Triangle ABP,ACP,ABC respectively. \(h_{a}\) is the altitude of ABC from A . Prove that \(\frac{1}{r_{3}}+\frac{1}{r_{2}}-\frac{r}{r_{2}r_{3}}=\frac{2}{h_{a}}\)

  3. If \(a,b,c\)are real numbers such that \(a^{2}=bc , a+b+c=abc\), then prove that \(a^{2}\geq3\).

  4. If \((x,y,z)\) are prime numbers then find all solutions of \(x(x+y)=120+z\).

5.Let ABC be an acute angled triangle with BC > AC. Let O be the circumcentre , H be the orthocentre of the triangle ABC . CF is the altitude . The perpendicular to OF at E meets the side CA at P . Prove that angle FHP = angle BAE.

6.Is it possible to write the numbers \(1,2,3....,121\) in an \(11 \times 11\) table so that any two consecutive numbers be written in cells with a common side and all perfect squares lie in a straight column?

7.The positive integers are seprated into two subsets with no common elements. Show that one of these subsets must contain a three term A.P.

  1. Prove that : If three lines from vertices of a triangle are concurrent then their isogonals are also concurrent

  2. \(ω=\sum_{n=1}^{2014}\sqrt{1+\frac{1}{n^{2}}+\frac{1}{(n+1)^{2}}}\). Find \(ω\).

Please reshare this note so that more people get to know about it. This note contain all the questions asked in the exam . Enjoy solving these questions. Remember the guidelines \(\color{red}{''novel..and...elegant...solutions.. will ..get ..extra ...credits.''}\).

Note by Shivam Jadhav
2 years ago

No vote yet
1 vote

  Easy Math Editor

MarkdownAppears as
*italics* or _italics_ italics
**bold** or __bold__ bold

- bulleted
- list

  • bulleted
  • list

1. numbered
2. list

  1. numbered
  2. list
Note: you must add a full line of space before and after lists for them to show up correctly
paragraph 1

paragraph 2

paragraph 1

paragraph 2

[example link](https://brilliant.org)example link
> This is a quote
This is a quote
    # I indented these lines
    # 4 spaces, and now they show
    # up as a code block.

    print "hello world"
# I indented these lines
# 4 spaces, and now they show
# up as a code block.

print "hello world"
MathAppears as
Remember to wrap math in \( ... \) or \[ ... \] to ensure proper formatting.
2 \times 3 \( 2 \times 3 \)
2^{34} \( 2^{34} \)
a_{i-1} \( a_{i-1} \)
\frac{2}{3} \( \frac{2}{3} \)
\sqrt{2} \( \sqrt{2} \)
\sum_{i=1}^3 \( \sum_{i=1}^3 \)
\sin \theta \( \sin \theta \)
\boxed{123} \( \boxed{123} \)

Comments

Sort by:

Top Newest

3) \(a^3=abc=a+b+c\ge a+2\sqrt{bc}=3a\implies a^2\ge 3\)

4) If \(x\) odd, \(y\) even, then \(y=2\implies x(x+2)=120+z\)\(\implies x^2-2x-120=z\)\(\implies (x-12)(x+10)=z\)\(\implies x=13, z=23\)

Else \(x(x+y)\) is even so \(z=2\) and \(x(x+y)=122=2\times 61\implies x=2, y=59\)

Only solutions are \((x,y,z)=(13, 2, 23), (2, 59, 2)\)

6) No. Just write the squares \(1^2, 2^2, \ldots , 11^2\) in a column and start filling in squares from \(1\). You will find that all moves are forced, and will not create a \(11\times 11\) shape.

Daniel Liu - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

Daniel liu can you explain your answer to problem 6 ?

Surekha Jadhav - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

Here's an even simpler solution.

WLOG let the numbers \(1^2, \ldots 11^2\) be going from top to bottom. Consider the stretch of numbers from \(k^2\) to \((k+1)^2=k^2+2k+1\). There are \(2k\) numbers from these two, which gives \(k\) numbers away and \(k\) numbers back as the farthest distance this sequence of numbers can go. However, that means that no matter what \(k\) we choose, we cannot reach either the top left or top right square, depending on where the column is. Thus, that square cannot be labelled by a square, and we are done.

Daniel Liu - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

@Daniel Liu I don't think the "WLOG" part is legal, it could be possible for \(1^2\) to start in the middle and swiggle its way through. I posted a solution for it.

Xuming Liang - 1 year, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

@Xuming Liang It's given that \(1^2, 2^2, \ldots , 11^2\) all lie on a column. I'm just saying to order them from top to bottom without loss of generality.

Daniel Liu - 1 year, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

Please help in solving problem number 2.

Shivam Jadhav - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

  1. Suppose the answer is yes, Observe that any path that begins with odd squared number and ends on the next (even) squared number only occurs on one side of the column, vise versa for paths that begin with even squares. We can count the number of squares on the "odd" side to be \(2(1+3+...+9)=2(5^2)=50\), which cannot happen since it must be divisible by \(11\). Therefore the answer is no.

Xuming Liang - 1 year, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

Can you solve the second question?

Shivam Jadhav - 1 year, 12 months ago

Log in to reply

what is r3 in the second question

Neel Khare - 1 year ago

Log in to reply

@Neel Khare r3=r1

Shivam Jadhav - 1 year ago

Log in to reply

Q 4)

Case 1: If \(z\) is an even prime i.e. \(z=2\). Then \(x(x+y) = 2 \times 61\). But since \(x+y > x\), the only possibility is \(x=2\) and \(y=59\). So, one solution in this case \((2,59,2)\).

Case 2: If \(z\) is an odd prime. Then \(x(x+y)\) is odd, which implies that both \(x\) and \(x+y\) giving out that \(y\) is even. But \(y\) is a prime, so \(y=2\). So the equation transforms into \(x^2 + 2x -(120+z)=0\). So, the discriminant should be a perfect square.

\[\implies \Delta = 4z + 484 =k^2 \quad ; \quad k \in \mathbb{Z}\] \[\implies 2|k\]

So, letting \(k=2l\).

\[\implies z = (l-11)(l+11)\]

But \(z\) is a prime. So, \(l-11=1\) and \(l+11=z\), which gives us that \(z=23\). Substituting in the above equation gives out that \(x=11\). Therefore \((11,2,23)\) is only solution in this case.

Therefore, total number of solutions are \(2\). And they are \((11,2,23)\) and \((2,59,2)\).

Surya Prakash - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

One question. Is Ramanujan the senior round?

Swapnil Das - 1 year ago

Log in to reply

@Shivam Jadhav here is the proof for Q1

Sualeh Asif - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

Please try second question

Shivam Jadhav - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

@Daniel Liu @Surya Prakash @Calvin Lin @Best of Geometry @Xuming Liang please help me in solving question number 2.

Shivam Jadhav - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

Q 7) 2) https://brilliant.org/problems/simply-awsome/ Similar problem

Surya Prakash - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

1)d^2=R^2-2Rr

Aakash Khandelwal - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

The answer to Q.4 is (2,59,2) and (11,2,23). So there are two solutions.

Kushagra Sahni - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

I had done Q1 about 1 year ago. The relation is \(d=\sqrt{R(R-2r)}\). It is famous and called as Euler Triangle formula. Its proof is based on cyclicity and a bit of trigonometry.

Nihar Mahajan - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

You need to prove it.

Shivam Jadhav - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

I have proved it.

Nihar Mahajan - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

@Nihar Mahajan Where?

Shivam Jadhav - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

Log in to reply

@Calvin Lin
@niharmahajan

Shivam Jadhav - 2 years ago

Log in to reply

×

Problem Loading...

Note Loading...

Set Loading...