Physics

Every metal has a definite work function. Why do all photoelectron not come out with the same energy if incident radiation is monochromatic? Why is there an energy distribution of photoelectron?

Note by Radhey Shyam Meena
4 years ago

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There is energy distribution because ::

Particles which are near the surface would get all the energy most and will be more energetic as K.E = hf - \phi ,

Particles which are deep in the metal will slowly get energy not max but will leave with slightly variation. Monochromatic is not necessary only thing that is need to be consider is the bonding of the metal.

Syed Baqir - 2 years, 10 months ago

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