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Physics project

I was recently given the task in my physics class to make a 10th grade level physics experiment for my class. We will be presenting them to elementary schools and the kids. Since it's a demonstration to elementary school students, I need to make it cool and exciting. I decided to make an experiment that shows what would happen if the earth had a hole in it that went out the other end. Of course I'm neglecting heat, friction, and air resistance. I'm also going to do this by using charged objects to act as gravity. The problem though that I've run into is that I'm not sure how to do this with the "earth" rotating. So how would you commpinsate for the Earth's rotational speed.

Note by Robert Fritz
3 years, 8 months ago

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What do you mean? Are you just going to have a globe with a hole in it? Are you trying to demonstrate gravity? What's up?

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 8 months ago

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Also, how did you take the mensa test without being 14 years old.

Robert Fritz - 3 years, 8 months ago

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You don't have to be 14. The youngest member is 3.

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 8 months ago

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@Finn Hulse I know that, but to take the "Admissions" test you have to be 14 or older.

Robert Fritz - 3 years, 8 months ago

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@Robert Fritz No you don't.

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 8 months ago

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@Finn Hulse Whaaaaaaaat!!! Now I'm really mad. I probably would have already taken the test if the website hadn't told me about the age qualification. Crud, whatever. Experience triumphs over information.

Robert Fritz - 3 years, 8 months ago

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I'm trying to demonstrate how if you dug a hole through earth and out the other end, and jumped in it. I know that you would keep accelerating until you passed the earth'a radius because then gravity would be slowing you down, but I wonder how to commpinsate for the earths rotational speed because I want it to be accurate. If you dropped a rock in down in a hole in earth it wouldn't reach the bottom because the earth is rotating.

Robert Fritz - 3 years, 8 months ago

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Put a supermagnet at the center, spin the globe around, and drop down a magnetic marble.

Finn Hulse - 3 years, 8 months ago

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@Finn Hulse But if I did that I think that the magnet would be to powerful and it would just make it stick to it. What if I got a magnet that was strong enough to attract the magnetic ball to it so that the ball would not move and hit the sides.

Robert Fritz - 3 years, 8 months ago

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@Robert Fritz Maybe I was just visualizing it differently.

Robert Fritz - 3 years, 8 months ago

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