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What is this?

Okay, the question is simple, but I don't know the answer.

"The statement that this sentence is a paradox is a paradox."

What is this? True? False? Paradox? Or something else?

Note by H.M. 유
2 months, 3 weeks ago

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logic, i like that

Lucia Vysohlid - 1 day, 7 hours ago

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Going back to linguistic philosophy - just because a sentence follows rules of grammar, and each word in it has a definite meaning, that doesn't mean that the sentence itself has any meaning whatsoever. I venture up from beneath the duvet to quote Chomsky's 'Colourless green ideas sleep furiously'. Perhaps this sentence is neither true nor false, but simply linguistic nonsense.

Katherine Barker - 2 weeks, 1 day ago

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I would say it isn't a paradox because it's referred to the statement. Also something can't be a paradox when you call it like that.

Marie Abendroth - 2 weeks, 1 day ago

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I think it's a tough question. I ask my friends this question and a part says true,the other ones no.

Marcel Probst - 3 weeks ago

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Apparantly, there are 2 contradictory definitions of 'paradox' (as if it wasn't complicated enough) 1.a seemingly absurd or contradictory statement or proposition which when investigated may prove to be well founded or true. 2.a statement or proposition which, despite sound (or apparently sound) reasoning from acceptable premises, leads to a conclusion that seems logically unacceptable or self-contradictory. I think the famous paradoxes all come under definition 2.

'Paradox' is usually used to describe a sentence/belief/theory that leads to a contradiction, but in these the word itself is not used eg the liar's paradox 'everything I say is false' or Russell's paradox which is generally stated as the "set of all sets that do not contain themselves" would be impossible, as if it existed, it would have to include itself, therefore its definition is contradictory.

So I wonder if your sentence is more in the realms of linguistic philosophy (the mere thought of which sends me running to hide under the duvet till it's safe to come out) rather than maths-facing logic.

Katherine Barker - 1 month, 4 weeks ago

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I'm sorry I can't help you, but I just wanted to say. Logic is very confusing, even the simplest questions can have great power. Just reading this question makes me confused...Well, that makes two of us.

William Huang - 2 months ago

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Yeah...

H.M. 유 - 2 months ago

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