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Why do we call things like this a function

Why do we call \(f(x) = \sqrt x\) a function, if by definition \(y = \sqrt x\) is not a function since for included values of \(x\), it gives us more than one value of \(y\) considering the positive and negative answers in the radicals?

Note by Geneveve Tudence
10 months, 3 weeks ago

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Whenever we are calling it function domain is R+ and range too Satyam Tripathi · 10 months, 2 weeks ago

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Have you read the list of common misconceptions wiki ? I recommend reading #8 in the "Powers and Square Roots" section of that wiki. Prasun Biswas · 10 months, 2 weeks ago

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Note that if you are using the radical "symbol" then you are talking only about the positive root.
So, \(\sqrt{64} = 8\) and not \(\pm8\). Yatin Khanna · 10 months, 2 weeks ago

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